On 15th August 2017, Frog Valley in partnership with Wayra organised an event presenting the best practices in regards to preparing your pitching deck.

On 15th August 2017, Frog Valley in partnership with Wayra (Telefonica’s accelerator) organised an event presenting the best practices in regards to preparing your pitching deck.

Harsh Jani, Co-Organiser at Frog Valley and Harry Rhys, Davies, Head of Regional Programmes at Wayra presented the do’s and don’ts of a pitching deck.  

What is the pitch deck. A pitch desk is a presentation of your company created for the purpose of raising capital.

  • Get people to understand
  • Get people to care
  • Get people to take action

It helps people to get clarity on what your business is about

Presentation deck should be 12 to 18 slides max whilst a reading deck should be 35 to 42 slides.

Try to follow the 10/20/30 rule:

10 slides

20 min

30 fonts sizes

‘If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough”, Albert Einstein

Below is our selection of the top Do’s

  • Have empathy with the people who are going to read your deck, put yourself in their shoes and make sure the deck is within context, organised, and flowing.
  • Make your deck being remarkable. Certainly worth using an agency to help you with graphic, visual and designs in this regards. Choose clean logo an inviting pictures. Keep it simple, beautiful and surprising
  • Present an exciting and presentable journey. Present the trajectory of where you are going. Ideas are nice but execution is everything.
  • Demonstrate research carried out, how big is the market and that you know your competitor.
  • Present your business model, customer acquisition cost, customer life time value.
  • Explain what would you do with the money you are raising and what the ambition of the company is. What are you asking for and what would the investors get in return.
  • On your last slide don’t forget the contact details, a closing statement, press coverage.

And the top Don’ts

  • Don’t make the readers “work too hard”
  • Don’t ask for an NDA
  • Don’t use redundant title
  • Don’t name investor deck 2017
  • Don’t neglect the team
  • Don’t use the “my product is too technical to pitch”
  • Avoid subjective statements
  • No jargon,
  • Not tech words / terminology

Finally, our advice is to practice your pitch as much as you can, time yourself, record yourself and do not hesitate to present to your mum or your partner. Presenting to an audience that is not an expert in your industry could help you simpliflying the information to make understable by anyone.

Thank you to everyone to came to our event and to Harry and Jani who did a fabulous presentation. We look forward to seeing you at our next event.

Event Partner

Frog Valley wants to thank Wayra for making this event happen.